When is Eid al-Fitr 2017 Date India Ramadan Eid or Eid-ul-Fitr 2017 India Day

By | June 19, 2017

Eid al-Fitr (Ramzan Id, Eid-ul-Fitar, or Idul-Fitr) is a gazetted holiday in India. It celebrates the end of Ramadan and marks the first day of the Islamic month of Shawwal.

Eid al-Fitr is celebrated for three days and is an official holiday in all Muslim-majority countries.

Ramadan Eid or Eid-ul-Fitr 2017 India Starts Date and Day

Eid or Eid al-Fitr marks the end of Ramadan, which is a month of fasting that started on May 27 and will finish on Saturday, June 24.

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Eid kickstarts the month of Shawwal, which begins with a feast to end the period of fasting.

Eid al-Fitr 2017 Date

Eid al-Fitr 2017 Date

The celebration is a public holiday in many Muslim countries, but is not one in the UK, despite a campaign for it to be recognised back in 2014.

Ramadan-Id or Eid al-Fitr 2017 in Delhi (India) will begin on the evening of Sunday,25 June and ends on the evening of Monday,26 June 2017.

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When is Eid al-Fitr 2017 India Date and Celebration?

This year, Eid starts on Sunday, June 25 and marks the start of a month of celebration.

The dates can be adjusted slightly nearer the time due to lunar sightings and changes each year.

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This is because the Islamic calendar – known as the Umm al-Qura calendar – is based on the moon’s cycle, whereas the Gregorian one is determined by the sun.

Many Muslims attend communal prayers and listen to a sermon at Eid al-Fitr. Those have not given the charity known as Zakat al-Fitr during Ramadan do so during Eid al-Fitr.

Zakat al-Fitr consisting of a quantity of food, such as barley, dates, raisins or wheat flour, or its monetary equivalent given to poor people in the community.

It is common for Islamic communities organise communal meals. Many Muslims in India also wear new clothes, visit family members, exchange Eid cards and give presents of sweets and small toys to children.

The celebration revolves around when Allah appeared to Ibrahim in a dream and asked him to sacrifice his son, Ishmael, as a sign of his faith.

It’s similar to the Christian and Jewish stories in which God asked Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac but spared him from doing so.

Stay tuned for other updates.

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